AdSense application checklist and tips to get AdSense approval

If you are applying for Google AdSense or if your application is disapproved, use the following checklist and make sure your site complies with all the requirements before you submit the AdSense application.

AdSense Tips

Tips to improve your chances of getting your AdSense application approved


Some of the suggestions mentioned below are mandatory requirements from Google and some others are just suggestions to improve your chances of getting your AdSense application approved. Go through the list and make sure your blog adheres to the requirements and follows the guidelines.

 

  • English content: Does your blog/site have majority of the content in English? AdSense ads can be served only on a limited number of languages and Google may reject your application unless your blog content is on one of the supported languages.

 

  • Privacy policy: Does your site have a privacy policy? Make sure you have a well written privacy policy and your site links to it from the bottom of all pages.

 

  • Mandatory statements: Does your privacy policy include the mandatory content, required by Google? It is important to include some information about the DoubleClick cookie; otherwise, Google will not approve your AdSense application. Find the required information to be included in your privacy policy.

 

  • 6 months requirement: In case of applicants from countries like India, China etc, Google requires that you should have owned the site for 6 months and that the site should be active and running for 6 months before they can apply for AdSense. Does your site meet the 6 months requirement? Has it been fully active for the last few months?

 

  • Age requirement: Are you at least 18 years old? The minimum age requirement to apply for Google AdSense is 18 years.

 

  • Adult content: Even though adult content is not bad always, Google does not allow AdSense Ads to be placed in sites that contain adult content, even if you claim they are meant for educational purpose. Read more about adult content guidelines.

 

  • Copyright violations: What kind of content you have? Have you reproduced articles from other sources like blogs, books, newspapers etc? You cannot use AdSense on sites that violate copyrights of others.

 

  • Unique content: This is something most bloggers fail to understand. Google likes blogs and websites with unique content. The word “unique” means “only one of its kind”. You must have articles on topics that are not covered in many other sites. Just writing articles in your words is not enough. Rather, you must write on topics that are not covered in any other sites. This is not a strict rule but the more unique content you have, the higher the chances you have to your AdSense application approved.

 

  • Original vs reproduced images: Many bloggers think that searching in Google for images and using them in their posts are allowed. That is not true. Taking images from other websites and using in blogs are not a good practice. Even if a website does not explicitly mention it, the images are copyrighted to the person who produced the image. The only exception is the images distributed as part of press releases and media kit. For example, cell phone manufacturers distribute images of their products and also allow using certain images in other websites.

 

  • About Us page: Does your website has an About Us page? Google does not like to work with anonymous partners. If you are running a website, your readers have the rights to know who you are. Include information about the person/team behind the website in the page and link to it from the bottom of all pages in your site. It will be a good idea to include the photo of the owner(s) in the About Us page to make it more authentic. Make sure the name of the AdSense applicant matches one of the team members listed in the About Us page.

 

  • Contact Us page: Does your site have a contact us page? There should be some ways to contact the owners of a website. Even though this requirement is not mentioned by Google, it’s always a good idea to add a “Contact Us” page and link to it from the bottom of all pages.

 

  • Advertisements: Are you using a lot of other ads in the site now? A clean site will look more impressive to Google. It may be a good idea to remove all other ads or reduce the number of ads before you apply for AdSense. I would recommend you to have no other ads if your application is rejected once.

 

  • Popups and sliders: Do you have any popups or sliding layers, which are considered intrusive to the users? Remove them before you apply for AdSense. Popups are always a bad idea. Even the sliding layers are not so intuitive to many users. Many bloggers use Facebook ‘Like’ boxes, which popups in a layer, which may not look appealing to a Google reviewer.

 

  • Hacking and related content: Hacking related content is a big No-No for Google AdSense. However, many people write articles on ethical hacking, which is generally considered as acceptable content. However, the same content can be used for ethical and non-ethical hacking, so, Google may disapprove your application in such cases. It will be a good idea to stay away from any kind of hacking related content in your website.

 

  • Gambling content: Google has placed some restrictions on gambling related content. Gambling is legal in some countries and you may have readers from those countries. But Google will allow you to use AdSense on your gambling related pages only if you are from a country where Gambling is legal. As of now, only the applicants from the these countries are allowed to apply for AdSense on gambling related sites: Austria, Greece, Portugal, Belgium, Ireland, Romania, Canada, Italy, Serbia, Denmark, Israel, Spain, Finland, Norway, Sweden, France, Peru, United Kingdom

 

  • Images vs Text: Do you have more images and videos than text? AdSense For Content works best with text and not on pages filled with images. If you have a lot of images and too little text, AdSense may fail to deliver contextual ads. Even if your website is an image hosting site, there should be sufficient text in each page, describing the image.

 

  • Number of articles: Even though Google has no specific requirements on the number of articles required to apply for AdSense, it is a good idea to wait until you have about 50 original, unique articles. If you have a good number of articles, you have higher chances of approval.

 

  • Length of articles: How long are your articles? Are they all too short? Try writing long articles that contain good amount of information. AdSense Ads will be relevant only if there is significant amount of content in the pages.

 

  • Misleading taglines: Does your blog has misleading tag lines or wrong claims like “Fastest growing blog in India” Don’t claim you being the best, unless you really are.

 

  • Traffic sources: What are your traffic sources? Are they all coming from non-organic sources like Facebook promotions, paid advertisements, unnatural link building etc? If majority of your traffic is from non-search, they may be considered as low quality traffic and may not get approved easily. Before you apply for AdSense, reduce your promotions and focus more on quality traffic from organic search.

 

  • Does your domain contain any offensive word or words that suggest some AdSense violation topics? For example, if you have domains like HackingTips.com, BestExplosives.com etc, Google may do very strict review of your site since the names suggest of offensive topics. In such cases, you may want to double check yourself and make sure you don’t have any content that violate Google policies.

 

  • Does your domain name contain any trademark words/names? Google does not support trademark violations. It may not be a violation in many cases to have trademarks of others in the domain name but Google may not be convinced since there is no opportunity for you to discuss with Google and convince them that you are not violating any trademarks by using such domain names. It is better to go for a ‘brandable’ domain name rather than using a name that contains a popular trademark.

 

Leave a Reply